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#402: Meeting Blue Rodeo

RECORD STORE TALES MkII: Getting More Tale
#402: Meeting Blue Rodeo

FIVEOn June 14 1991, touring to support their third album Casino, Blue Rodeo came around to headline at the COE – Central Ontario Exhibition – in Kitchener.  The opening act was Strange Days featuring Shannon Lyon, a local singer-songwriter whose earlier tunes didn’t appeal to the older ladies in the crowd.  The younger folks dug Strange Days, but there was clearly another segment of the audience who thought they were too loud and raucious.

When Blue Rodeo took the stage, it was with the near-legendary Bob Wiseman on keyboards.  Wiseman departed Blue Rodeo about a year and a half later, so we were lucky to see this unique individual live in concert.  Also present were leaders Jim Cuddy and Greg Keelor, bassist Bazil Donovan, and drummer  Mark French.  French would be gone soon after, too.  It was a very short-lived lineup:  one album only.

I had just graduated highschool, and we had four tickets to the show; a great way to kick off the last summer holidays before university.  My sister and I attended with my friend Bob and a buddy of his.  Blue Rodeo played a generous selection from their first three albums:  Outskirts, Diamond Mine, and Casino.  In addition Bob Wiseman was given the spotlight for a moment to pick up a guitar and sing a brand new solo song called “We Got Time”.

The big surprise of the night was when a few (probably loaded) guys in their mid-20’s decided to go stage diving at a Blue Rodeo show. The band were noticeably surprised themselves by the stage divers.  Not something you’re used to seeing at a country rock show where a percentage of the audience was over retirement age.


When Greg announced this song, both Bob and I asked, “What did he say? Is the song called ‘Piranha Poo’??”

After the big encores, the house lights went on.  We were all but ready to leave the COE, when Bob noticed Jim Cuddy and the rest of the band exiting through a side door.  “I think I just saw the guy from Blue Rodeo go through that door.  Let’s follow him!” he said.  There didn’t seem to be any reason not to, so we made our way out the door, down the hallway of that old hockey arena, and followed the band right into the dressing room!  I was a bit more nervous than my friends, but nobody tried to stop us or even talk to us.  My eyes went wide as I scanned the dressing room.  It was filled with food and drink, and fans!

We each made the rounds to ask the band to sign stuff for us.  The two we didn’t approach were Bob Wiseman and Mark French who appeared too busy so we didn’t bother them.  Bazil Donovan quietly smiled and signed our things.  Since I didn’t have much in hand, he signed a photo of my guitar that I kept in my wallet!  Greg Keelor signed my ticket stub.  While doing so, I expressed amazement at the stage diving!  “Yeah, it was fun!” said Greg, who probably hadn’t witnessed it too often in his career!  Jim Cuddy signed the other side of my ticket stub.  Bob had already chucked his ticket and had nothing to get signed, so he handed Jim Cuddy a $5 bill.  “Can you sign it, ‘To Bob, the best $5 I ever had?’ said Bob.  Jim chuckled and signed it as requested.  Unfortunately, Bob being the cheapskate that he is, spent the $5 bill later!  Somewhere out there in circulation was a $5 bill that said, “The best $5 I ever had, Jim Cuddy.”*

I already liked the band’s music, but I became a Blue Rodeo fan for life that night.  Not only are they a consistently great live act, but nice guys too.  I met Jim a few years ago at one of his solo concerts, and he still treats his fans like gold.  That’s the kind of band that has earned my undying support.

In 2012, Blue Rodeo came out with their box set, 1987-1993, containing their first five albums plus three discs of rarities.  Having re-bought the albums, I sent my originals over to Aaron! What I forgot was that I had stored my signed stuff with those CDs! Fortunately Aaron found the autographs inside, and sent them back pronto!  Thanks man.

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REVIEW: Blue Rodeo – Greatest Hits vol. 1 (2001)

Happy Mothers Day to all the moms out there!

BLUE RODEO GREATEST HITS_0001BLUE RODEO – Greatest Hits vol. 1 (2001 Warner)

Blue Rodeo are not a “Greatest Hits” band. Indeed, before this album came out, Jim and Greg routinely used to say, “We’ll only do a greatest hits when we’re finished.” Well, record company pressure must have gotten to them (or they may have just outlasted their own expectations), and they released this typical hits compilation: 12 hits and 2 new songs, just like every other band’s hits compilation.

The problem with Blue Rodeo is that they are so much more than the sum of their hits. Sure, “Rose-Coloured Glasses” (track 2) is a hit single, but what about “Rebel” or “Heart Like Mine”? (This is the album version of “Rose-Coloured Glasses”, not the very rare single remix, only available on 7″ single back in 1986). There’s simply no room on a single disc hits album for the songs that define the Blue Rodeo sound. Blue Rodeo were and still are more about albums, the bigger picture.  Especially in the early days, each album was a different direction from the last.  Each of the first five (and arguably six) first Blue Rodeo studio albums stand as critically important pieces of work.

Having said that, you do get a generous slice of hits here. Fans know these songs already, so I won’t spend too much time talking about them. “Lost Together”, the full length version of “Diamond Mine”, “Bad Timing”, “Try”…these are all songs that saturated the radio in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Peppered along with them are tunes like “Trust Yourself” from Casino, a minor single that some might have forgotten. I was pleased that “Side of the Road” and “Dark Angel” were here, which represent Blue Rodeo’s less commercial side.

For those who love Jim’s ballads, some of his most notable are here.  For those who prefer Blue Rodeo’s radio country-rocking side, there is “Til I Am Myself Again”, “It Could Happen to You” and the classic “Hasn’t Hit Me Yet”.  Greatest Hits vol. 1 is a fair slice of great tunes.  Certainly there are none to skip…just that there are plenty more where these came from.

Missing in action: any songs from The Days In Between, Blue Rodeo’s most recent album at the time. I guess that’s because The Days In Between just was the first underwhelming Blue Rodeo album. The US version of Greatest Hits subbed in Jim’s hit ballad “Bulletproof” from the later Palace Of Gold, instead of “It Could Happen To You” from Tremelo. (Palace Of Gold followed Greatest Hits, but not in the US where this was released afterwards.)

The two new tracks were a revelation. Blue Rodeo had started experimenting with a horn section, and the Greatest Hits tour featured these additional musicians on their back catalogue. The two new songs also feature the horns and strings.  This led into their next album, the aforementioned Palace of Gold, which utilized these instruments throughout.  A re-recording of “After The Rain” benefits greatly from their soulful sounds (not to mention extended solos and jamming). The Bee Gees cover “To Love Somebody” (lead vocal by Greg) has ended up being one of the best covers Blue Rodeo has done to date, live or otherwise. The new sound with horns would be fully realized on Palace Of Gold, but fear not if you don’t like this sound: they soon reverted to the classic configuration of the band.

My best advice is, if you want to really check out some Blue Rodeo, pick up those early albums one by one when you find them cheap (it’s not hard to do). If “Try” is your favourite song, pick up Outskirts, and then explore the rest of the gems on that classic record. Likewise if “Lost Together” is the only song you know, pick up that album and be surprised by the deep album cuts that you would have missed otherwise. And most of all, see the band live.

3.5/5 stars

REVIEW: Blue Rodeo – “Til I Am Myself Again” (cassette single)

BLUE RODEO – “Til I Am Myself Again” (1990 cassette single)

From my years at the record store, I’ve seen scores of copies of this single on CD.  It has four tracks, all album tracks.  The cassette single on the other hand was something special.  It had a unique bonus track called “5 Day Disaster” that (so far as I know) was exclusive to the cassette format.

In 1990, (Casino era) Blue Rodeo had gone down the road of simpler, short pop-country-rock songs, and “5 Day Disaster” is one of these.  It’s a peppy, uptempo Jim Cuddy blaster with an unforgettable chorus.  It has strong upfront keyboards by Bobby Wiseman, including a piano solo.

The A-side was of course one of Blue Rodeo’s biggest early hits.  It too is a short poppy Jim Cuddy song.  Both songs are credited to the duo of Greg Keelor/Jim Cuddy.  It should be assumed that both songs were also produced by Pete Anderson, although the credits on “5 Day Disaster” are not clear, they both sound cut from the same cloth.

Cassette single tracklist:  Side A:  “Til I Am Myself Again” / Side B:  “5 Day Disaster”

CD single (not shown in photos) tracklist:  1. “Til I Am Myself Again”   2. “What Am I Doing Here”  3. “Rebel”  4. “Diamond Mine”

4/5 stars

(NOTE:  A few months after posting this review, Blue Rodeo reissued “5 Day Disaster”, now titled “5 Day Disaster Week”, on their excellent 1987-1993 box set!  Thanks guys!)

Note that I have the US version of Casino below.  Notice the different logo from the cassette?  In the US they were still using the Diamond Mine logo!