Terminator 2: Judgement Day

Gallery: Sven Gali swag, ReAction figures, and Rock and Roll Children from Live Stream unboxing

Thanks for watching last night’s stream if you did, and no worries if you didn’t.  I did some unboxings but due to the limitations of resolution, couldn’t show off my new arrivals very clearly.  Here are some photos for you to enjoy!

First off:  if you remember, back in July somebody stole my copy of Michael D. LeFevre‘s book Rock and Roll Children right out of the mail.  Michael (better known to you as 80s Metal Man) sent me a new copy right out of his own pocket.  He didn’t have to do that.  Thank you, thank you, thank you.  I’m happy to finally have a copy.

Next:  Sven Gali!  I won a Facebook contest and the band sent me some swag!  The guitar pick neck chain (with the late Dee Cernile’s name on the back) is my favourite.  They also sent a glossy photo (top) signed by all five members:  Andy Frank, Shawn Minden, Dave Wanless, Dan Fila and Sean Williamson.  Finally we have a new copy of their excellent new EP 3.  I played it again this week and I like it more now than I did then.  I have given my extra copy to loyal reader and friend Len Labelle.

Finally:  From a shitty Amazon seller comes Super 7’s ReAction figure for a battle-damaged T-1000 from Terminator 2: Judgement Day.  What’s up with the shitty seller?  They stuffed this figure in a box that was too small for the card, damaging it and making the figure fall out loose.  I was going to open him, but then I noticed he was a limited edition exclusive.  Would have been nice to have the option to keep him sealed if I felt like it.  Well, he’s open now, and ready to do battle with Autobots, Decepticons, Aliens, and ghouls.  This is a universal action figure line compatible with the 1977 Kenner Star Wars figures.  Ever wanted Ben Kenobi to take on Snake Pliskin?  You could do it now!

If you missed the show, you can stream it below.

#820: The Last Note of Freedom (1991 – Part One)

This is Part One of a series based around the year 1991. In music, culture and my personal life, 1991 was a landmark year. There was life pre-1991, and there was life post-1991. I’ve spent a couple months piecing together details of that critical period. Stick around and enjoy the memories.

GETTING MORE TALE #820:  The Last Note of Freedom
(1991 Was the End and 1991 Was the Beginning – Part One)

After all the hard work, studying and good times, there was only one thing left to do:  attend the big highschool graduation ceremony.  I’d be seeing some of my friends for the very last time.  Shirt and tie on, I was clean shaven and ready to go.  Family arrived at the house and gifts were given.  I remember a new watch.  I even received the novelization of the hot new Schwarzenegger flick, Terminator 2: Judgement Day from my sister Kathryn.

Only this time I wouldn’t be back.  This was it.  The last hoorah.

Blue graduation cap upon my head, I looked like a girl with my long hair.  I barely recognise myself in the old photos, receiving my diploma on that big stage.

Like many graduation ceremonies, there was a slideshow to remind us of all the good times.  The song they chose for the slideshow was an interesting selection:  “The Last Note of Freedom” by David Coverdale, his first solo track in a decade and a half.  Who selected it and why, I will never know.  It was the kind of song I would have chosen myself, but I had nothing to do with it.  I just found the title very apropos:  “The Last Note of Freedom”, and when that last note rings out, we would be cast into the larger ocean of “real life”.  It was a poignant choice even if the lyrics really didn’t apply.  The words had nothing to do with a milestone like graduation, but it sure sounded cool when Coverdale started screaming in the middle of the ceremony.

We need love,
We gotta want it so bad.
We need it now,
So run for it fast.
I know it,
And the world will be cheated.
I can’t go on, in a world where love’s defeated.
I know it.
I can’t go on.

“The Last Note of Freedom” was from the Days of Thunder soundtrack, and I made sure to order a copy from Columbia House forthwith.  It was probably the most commercial track that Coverdale had recorded to date, with a vaguely 80s tropi-synth feel.

I would never see many of my friends again, and I knew it as I walked out of the building with my grad cap in my hands.  I shook hands with Anand “Boboe” Etwaru who I never crossed paths with ever again.  I was pleased to find out, many years later from a mutual friend, that he still had the nickname “Boboe” which I gave him.  (It’s just the ASCII characters for “Anand” with each letter bumped up by one, an accidental discovery I made.)

My parents owned a rental cottage and I wanted to rent it for one weekend, just a final chance to hang out with my friends.  The parents said “no way” and the last weekend never happened.  Instead, a bunch of us just made a run downtown to Sam the Record Man one afternoon.  We walked – none of us had a car.  It was fun and bittersweet.  The new Van Halen sat there on the shelves but the packaging was rather bland.  It would have to wait for my birthday.  Instead I bought some singles:  “You Could Be Mine” (CD), by Guns N’ Roses, and “More Than Words” (cassette) by Extreme.

I can still recall one thing that happened that day.  As our small group walked down Frederick Street towards King, we passed by a little old lady.  As we passed her, she smiled and chuckled an evil laugh!

“Heh heh heh heh!”

Creepy stuff, man!

“We’re hexed now!” someone commented.

I’m glad that a small group of my friends got back together for one record shopping trip in the summer of ’91.  We knew things would be different from here on in.  Many of them were going into serious engineering programs.  Intense, time consuming stuff.  On some of my lonely days that fall, I thought of picking up the phone and calling some of them.  But I didn’t.  “They all have their own lives now,” I reasoned.

An era had ended, and the last note of freedom had rung.  Onto bigger things!