Sunday Screening

Sunday Screening: The Soviet national anthem as sung by Nikolai Volkoff

One of the greatest “heel” tag teams of all time were Nikolai Volkoff and the Iron Sheik.  It was the height of the Cold War, and what could be more antagonising than the Russian national anthem sung in the middle of Madison Square Gardens?  Only the Sheik declaring “Russia #1, Iran #1!” and spitting on the USA.  In reality Nikolai (Josip Hrvoje Peruzović) was from Yugoslavia and was known as a really nice guy.  By contrast, the Sheik (Hossein Khosrow Ali Vaziri) actually is from Iran and might be a little psychopathic!  Or it could all be an act, who knows?

Even though Nikolai’s anthem was designed to irritate, I actually like it.

In 1990 Nikolai switched sides, turned “face,” and was gifted an American flag by “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan.  (Incidentally, Duggan and Sheik were once caught doing cocaine together, a tremendous scandal as they were supposed to be sworn enemies!)  Nikolai used “The Stars and Stripes Forever” as his entrance music when he turned “face”, waving his new American flag.

But I’ll always remember him as one of the greatest villains, singing that Russian national anthem as only he could!

Sunday Screening: Polychuck – “Beating Myself Down”

From his just released new EP Shadows Exposed, it’s Polychuck‘s fresh video for “Beating Myself Down“! He’s a talented multi-instrumentalist, and this very different but boppin’ track is right up my alley. The guitar solo at the end will knock you on your ass.  This is a catchy, upbeat but lyrically serious tune with relatable words.  Check out “Beating Myself Down” and don’t miss Polychuck when we have him on the LeBrain Train on July 31!

 

Sunday Screening: Interview No-Shows: Mean Gene Okerlund edition

Having recently joined the “interview no-show” club, let’s have a look at some other no-show related interviews. Things go off the rails when Mean Gene has to interview a missing Captain Lou Albano. He also has to confront Kamala the Ugandan Headhunter about some interviews he missed up in St. Louis.  Have a look at the WWF when things go off the rails!

 

Sunday Screening: The SoonerMobile

Can you identify this strange vehicle?

Sunday Screening: Polychuck – “Exposure”

Thomas Polychuck is a hot new artist out of Montreal.  He’s a multi-instrumentalist with a “do it yourself” attitude.  He has a new EP out called Exposure, and Deke and I will be speaking to Thomas on the July 31 episode of the LeBrain Train.  Polychuck prides himself in his guitar shredding (since age 13!) and you can hear a bit of that on this track “Exposure”.

Let us know what you think of Polychuck and get your questions locked and loaded for our interview!

 

Sunday Chuckle Screening: Styx – “Love is the Ritual” (1990)

In 1990, Styx reunited — but without Tommy Shaw. Busy with Damn Yankees, Shaw would have to be replaced. And, let’s face it, it always seemed like most of the Styx friction was between Tommy Shaw and Dennis DeYoung. Needing someone to fill Tommy’s “Shooz”, they recruited young singer/songwriter/guitarist Glen Burtnik.

The DeYoung/Young/Burtnik/Panozzo/Panozzo lineup produced one album, Edge of the Century. It was heralded by lead single “Love is the Ritual”, a decidedly un-Styx-like attempt to break into the 1990 rock market after a seven year absence.

You could mistake it for Winger. With Burtnik front and center, Styx take a back seat in their own music video. Dennis is rarely seen, only needed when there’s a “Hey!” backing vocal.  Glen fronts the band with microphone in hand — no guitar. If ever there was a music video built to appeal to the young while trying to hide the age or identity of the band, it is “Love is the Ritual”. The clip is padded out with shots of women and a Fabio-like dude. Truly an awful video, and an embarrassing attempt to grab the brass ring one more time.

Sunday Screening: Jacob Moon – “Come Talk to Me”

Yesterday’s guest on the LeBrain Train was Jacob Moon, the talented singer/songwriter who shot to YouTube fame with his incredible cover of “Subdivisions“.  Shot on the same rooftop, “Come Talk to Me” is another video worth checking out.  This Peter Gabriel cover shimmers with its own brilliance. Check out Moon’s innovative guitar technique here.  Please enjoy!

Sunday Screening: Jacob Moon & Adi Berk – “Red Sector A”

Our guest on next Saturday’s LeBrain Train episode is Jacob Moon, talented singer/songwriter/guitarist from Hamilton, Ontario. He has done a number of Rush covers, but never does them “by the book”. He always takes a different angle. His piano-based approach on “Red Sector A” (Adi Berk on keys) is a stark change from the high-tech original. Jacob’s remarkable voice becomes the focus.  Have a listen, and make sure you tune in next week to chat with Jacob himself!

Sunday Screening: The Four Horsemen – “Nobody Said It Was Easy”

In honour of our special surprise guest yesterday, Mr. Dave Lizmi!  One of the truly greatest hits 30 years ago in 1991 was “Nobody Said It Was Easy” by The Four Horsemen.  Its dirty rock and roll sound clashed with everything going on at the time.  They were rock, they were punk, they were southern, they were screaming, and they were truly special.  “Nobody Said It Was Easy” is the song that hooked us.

THE FOUR HORSEMEN

  • Frank C. Starr – vocals
  • Haggis – rhythm and slide guitars
  • Dave Lizmi – lead and rhythm guitars
  • Ben Pape – bass
  • Kenneth “Dimwit” Mongomery – drums

Thank you Dave!  Rest in peace Frank and Ken.

2nd Sunday Screening: 4 Max the Axe videos for you!

It’s a long weekend in Canada and I chose to spend my Saturday going through video footage on my hard drive.  Every Sausagefest I take a lot of video and most of it never gets used.  What I discovered was that I had a lot of fun footage that just needed to find a home.

At the same time, I have been making videos for Max the Axe songs, so I can use them on the LeBrain Train.  I like having music videos to play so we can take breaks, and I need things that won’t set off copyright strikes.  All of this footage I’m discovering is helping me kill two birds with one stone.  Or, as Ricky might say, get two birds stoned at once.

“Gods On the Radio” is the first one I made, for the Friday May 14th show.  It’s Max’s favourite.  It doesn’t have any previously unseen footage in it; it is just a video I made to play that night.  All the footage was simply edited down from the Sausagestfest 2019 video.  Dave Haslam approved of the editing and that inspired me to make more.

I didn’t want to keep recycling old footage that everybody has seen, so I started exploring the hard drive for “Next Plane to Vegas”, which was debuted on the Friday May 21 episode of the LeBrain Train.

One of my favourite Max songs is “Overload” from the EP of the same name.  Problem is:  it’s short.  Too short for me to play on the show and still get enough of a break to make a coffee.  So I had to extend it.  I found some cool footage of Uncle Meat singing and drumming “New Orleans Is Sinking” in 2014, accompanied by Max on backing vocals.  This served as a good intro to extend the video.  Bonus:  rare footage of Max playing bass.  60-70% of the footage has never been seen before.

Another goodie but shortie is “I Don’t Advocate Drugs” from Trillion Dollar Threats.  Mickey Straight sang this one with Max at the Boat House, so although Ted Moore is credited on the album, I used a little bit of Mickey footage that I had a few times in this clip.  The video is about 60-70% previously unseen video.

 


BONUS!

I took the most footage at Sausagefest 2015, where this video was performed.  We had multiple live bands jamming and I got video of a lot of it.  Unfortunately, the audio on most of it was completely unusable due to a problem with the camera.  Also, very few songs were captured in full, thanks to a rapidly draining battery.  I did, however, capture this unique version of “Seven Nation Army” by the White Stripes, played improvisationally, on the fly.  Though wobbly at times, the vocal is solid, the bass outstanding, and the take on it is unique.  The soloing in the long outro is smokin’.  I’m glad I recorded the whole thing.  If you stay tuned to the end, you’ll hear Bucky complaining that he forgot the snare drum.  That was true.  “Seven Nation Army” and every other song that weekend was performed without a snare!  (It sounds like they were about to go into “Iron Man” at the very end.)