Loudness

REVIEW: Loudness – On The Prowl (1991)

LOUDNESS – On The Prowl (1991 Atco)

Loudness made a distinctly commercial move when giving original lead singer Minoru Niihara his walking papers.  They replaced him with American singer Mike Verscera, and on some tracks, they made a turn towards radio-playable rock.  Their second record with Vescera was an interesting one.  1991’s On The Prowl features only three new songs, and eight re-writes from their first four Japanese albums.  To most listeners, they would be like new songs anyway.

“Down ‘N Dirty” is predictably a hard rocker, slightly sleezy like something Extreme or Bulletboys would have put out.  Not a bad song by any means.  It surpasses many of its better-known contemporaries by being a bit heavier and by virtue of Vescera’s amazing voice.  Having a schooled shredder like Akira Takasaki on lead guitar doesn’t hurt either.  But this is a far cry from a “Rock and roll Crazy Night”!

Second track, “Playin’ Games” attempts to go back to the speedy metal of Loudness’ past.  It is partially successful.  There’s some ripping and shredding going on between Akira and drummer Munetaka Higuchi, who is awesome on this.

Third and last of the new songs, “Love Toys” does compete for “worst title”.  Not a bad track actually, with some different playing from Akira, just a bad title.  It seemed obvious they were trying for something that worked in America.  No songs about crazy doctors this time.  Good tune, cool riff, and some great drumming.

Vescera rewrote all the lyrics for the re-recordings.  Not all the originals were in Japanese before, but perhaps Vescera was meant to make the lyrics more accessible.  “Never Again” was once known as “Silent Sword” (single B-side), a fine ballad indeed, but you can see how the lyrical change would make it a little easier for some to digest.  The chorus is also beefed up, massively.  Keyboard adornments sweeten the tune further.

“Deadly Player” (formerly “Lonely Player) was an early thrashing diamondback snake in the original days, and it still kicks tremendous ass.  There’s a Rush-like quality to the opening, but then Vescera gets a-screamin’.  A frantic mixture of disparate metallic parts welded together, this tune is aimed at the brain.  Akira even takes a jazzy guitar interlude.

1984’s Disillusion boasted a cool but challenging tune called “Milky Way”; here it is re-titled “Take It Or Leave It” but it is no less slammingly fun.  The chorus is probably an improvement, but that’s highly subjective.  The playing is awesome.

“Girl” is one of only two tracks not re-titled in some way.  This oldie from Devil Soldier is one of the most twisty & turny tunes, with challenging timing.  It is faithful to the 1982 original.  Though far heavier, it even has a Zeppelin-like flavour to one of the main riff sections.  You could picture Page and Bonham jamming on it, but then the track goes full metal (with some serious jazz to the guitars).

1988’s “Long Distance Love” is the most recent track on this album to get the re-recording treatment.  From the Jealousy EP, it was never available in the States even though Loudness already had three studio records out in North America.  It’s more mid-tempo and melodic than the earlier tracks tackled here.  Presumably, Loudness felt it was overlooked.  Re-titled “Long Distance”, it came pre-packed with a solid chorus and Van Halen-like hooks.

The legendary “In the Mirror” (no title change) was always one of the early band’s greatest triumphs.  Like a lost Judas Priest classic, it combines riff and tempo in that magical way that gets the heads a-bangin’.  Vescera’s high pitched screaming (his control is enviable!) adds a modern taste, but the song is just as fortified as ever.

“Sleepless Nights” is now a plural.  The original (singular “Sleepless Night”) from The Law of Devil’s Land boasted one of Akira’s very best riffs.  Recreated here, with modern production, it is like concrete.  Perhaps Minoru Niihara’s original vocal was harder to digest, so here Mike sings with more attention to melodic sensibilities.  What a riff though!  Let’s not kid ourselves — this song is about the riff.  The chorus is different though, and perhaps less of a fit than the original.

The last track is the earliest:  “Find A Way” was originally known as “To Be Demon” on the Loudness debut album The Birthday Eve.  This classic is half ballad, half monster riff-race!  It’s shorter than the original, beginning as a ballad without the speed-rock intro.  The vocal melody is completely different and certain memorable sections of the song are missing or altered.  While the new version is undeniably more immediate, it might be at a cost.  In both versions, Akira slays.

At the end of it all, On The Prowl is mostly an exercise in improved production.  Those Japanese albums were not recorded with the kind of expertise that Loudness were able to employ in Los Angeles.  The raw appeal of the originals will always be there, but the sonics here are clearly better.  That’s On The Prowl‘s strength.  Not to mention the new singer was no hack.  But there’s a certain commercial slant to new tracks, particularly “Down ‘N Dirty” that feels out of place.

Needless to say, On The Prowl did not reverse Loudness’ fortunes and they were soon without a singer once more.  Abandoning the American adventure for the time being, they looked back to Japan for a new singer:  E-Z-O’s Masaki Yamada.  1992’s incredible Loudness continued the story, with Yamada even adding “Down ‘N Dirty” to the setlist!  Maybe it wasn’t so bad after all?

4/5 stars

GUEST REVIEW: Anthem – Ultimate Best Of Nexus Years (2012) by Thunder Blackmore

By Thunder Blackmore

ANTHEM – Ultimate Best Of Nexus Years (2012 King Record Co.)

In the world of metal, there is no short list of underrated bands from every corner and country of the world. Specially with long-standing bands that are still going strong to this day. Would it be bands like E-Z-O from Japan, Pretty Maids from Denmark, Thor from Canada, or Helloween from Germany, everyone regardless of nationality has a favorite band, who did well for themselves, but could’ve, would’ve and should’ve gone big. And while my choice for most underrated metal band ever would go to my fellow countrymen Pretty Maids (national bias has its moments), Japanese metal legends Anthem earns the runner-up spot, easily.

The band, led by bassist Naoto Shibata, who are perhaps more famous for his work with Loudness and Crush 40 in the 90’s, had a tough time in the 80’s with success in their homeland and even a small US tour in ’87, but also with internal struggles which prevented the band to go beyond like their fellow and more successful countrymen, Loudness. Ultimately the band would be disbanded in 1992 until they reunited in 2001 and have been going strong since then. A band considered by many to be part of the big four of Japanese Metal (with X Japan, Loudness and Flatbacker/E-Z-O) with mostly consistent excellent releases throughout the years, who just now are getting released to the west on streaming services and (hopefully) physically by Nuclear Blast. So far, there’s two options for getting into Anthem’s discography, which just so happen to be compilations. For their new era, there is Nucleus, released by the aforementioned Nuclear Blast. But as for their classic period, the import to buy is this one. Ultimate Best Of Nexus Years.

Japanese releases has a reputation of not being a very cheap options, so getting this compilation is definitely a good starter point. It collects songs from the band’s initial 80’s era, starting with the self-titled debut and ending with their final album before their hiatus, Domestic Booty (you’ll be the judge for the supposed meaning of “booty”). Given that the compilation is split into two cd’s, it also reflects the times with the singers Eizo Sakamoto and Yukio Morikawa representing disc 1 and 2, respectively. This decision, coupled with the track list being in chronological order, can be difficult at first listen. Not necessarily with the tracks themselves but more with the unevenness with the production, as the first Anthem albums sound pretty rough. Granted, that’s not a problem exclusive to the band, but that also means that you’ll have to skip to track 13, “Bound to Break”, if you are somewhat put off by the roughness.

If you can hang with it, you are in for 2 hours of kickass catchy melodic metal majesty from glorious Nippon with no noteworthy duds. Even with my nitpicky desire to swap out some tracks for others, I’m still absolutely happy with this purchase. Standouts have to be “Venom Strike”, “Shadow Walk”, “Bound to Break”, “Hunting Time”, “Night After Night” and “Show Must Go On”. The latter being their first original song with English lyrics (courtesy of the late Chris Tsangarides) and being their first to be featured in the Anime OVA, Devilman.

Until Anthem can finally release their back-catalog on physical media for a much more affordable price (CD, vinyl or otherwise), this one will do wonders in the meantime.

4.95/5 stars

Thanks to Thunder Blackmore for this awesome review.

 

 

VIDEO: Mail Call! 6 CDs from Robert

I thought these six CDs had been lost in the mail. I am so, so glad to be wrong.

REVIEW: Loudness – Metal Mad (2008)

“Forever, carry on!  Turning up the sound and let it roll.  Raise your fist up in the sky!  The spirit of metal will never die!”

LOUDNESS – Metal Mad (2008 Tokuma Japan)

Loudness reunited their original lineup in 2000, but little did they know it would not last a full decade.  Drummer Munetaka Higuchi was diagnosed with liver cancer only two months after the release of the 2008 album Metal Mad.  He passed away in November of that year.  Although they had enough drum tracks recorded to make one more record with Higuchi (2009’s The Everlasting), Metal Mad was the last in his lifetime.

Metal Mad is the 21st Loudness studio album, recorded in the midst of a flurry of studio activity, as Loudness never slowed down, and guitarist Akira Takasaki was pounding out solo work on top of it.

One certain thing about Loudness:  just because they reunited the original lineup doesn’t mean they wanted to backtrack musically.  Metal Mad is heavy.  It continues the sonic experimentation that Loudness began in the mid 90s.  Though it does contain one undeniable anthem, this album is a heavy grind of metal styles, all very loud.

The opening instrumental “Fire of Spirit” sets the tone with a heavy riff that could have come from one of Loudness’ thrash contemporaries like Megadeth or Metallica…but with far more weight, and with an absolute master on the drums.  There’s a hint of the St. Anger snare, but it does not persist through the album.  Instead the track fades into the anthem of the album:  “Metal Mad”!

“Metal Mad” is a fast, simple track, but damn does it get the job done!  “Forever! Carry on! Turning up the sound and let it roll. Raise your fist up in the sky! The spirit of metal will never die!”  Custom built for the festival crowds.  Akira takes a couple bananas solos as the perfect icing on this sweet piece of metal cake.

But that’s it for that style of metal on this album.  They thrash through “High Flyer” with singer Minoru Niihara’s voice filtered through distortion.  Then it’s a hint of rap metal on the very aggressive “Spellbound #9”.  Funny thing is, Minoru can pull it off.  This is heavy stuff, certainly strong enough to compete with the big name heavy bands that Loudness inspired in the first place.  “Crimson Paradox” takes on groove metal, with a touch of exotic guitar added for spice.

The metal is heavy on “Black and White”, but with lyrics like “bullshit bullshit”, it’s a little too much of the “nu” variety.  Same with the droning guitar and vocal of “Whatsoever”, though the melodic chorus isn’t bad.  “Call of the Reaper” takes things back to centre with a riff similar to “Be Quick Or Be Dead” by Iron Maiden, but within a song that goes in a different direction.  Mental solos!  “Can’t Find My Way” starts promisingly, with quiet experimental guitars, and focuses strongly on vocal melody despite the heavy riffing going on.  In fact the only thing wrong with it is one particular riff that too strongly resembles (ugh) “Loch Ness” by Judas Priest.

The end of the album is heralded by two interesting final tracks, “Gravity” and “Transformation”, both experimental with grooves and great guitar work.  Akira uses so many different tones on this album, often within the same song.  “Gravity” is guitar player nirvana, while “Transformation” even goes a little funky.

Metal Mad ain’t bad.  Its strength is the musicianship.  Metal Mad has the title track going for it, but not a lot of actual memorable songs besides that.  By focusing so much on being heavy, it loses distinction between the songs.

3/5 stars

REVIEW: Loudness – Once And For All (1994)

LOUDNESS – Once And For All (1994 WEA Japan)

When Loudness released their first live album with new singer Masaki Yamada Once And For All, they took the oft-misguided step that many bands with replacement singers make.  Much like Van Halen, they dropped the majority of their earlier material from the set and focused on the new album.  Unlike Van Halen, this wasn’t done due to ego, but because of changing styles of the 90s.

You hate when bands do that, don’t you?  Well allow Loudness to open your mind on the concept.

In 1992, Loudness released their self-titled new album with Masaki on vocals.  It is excellent.  Like many late-period self-titles, it sounds like a new start.  Masaki was a very different kind of singer from either Minoru Niihara or Mike Vescera.  Truthfully his voice was not well suited to the old material (shades of Blaze Bayley).  Focusing on the fine, new songs for their first live album together was a wise move.

Loudness opened this live set with some smokin’ guitar licks and the first two tracks from the new album:  “Pray For the Dead” and “Slaughterhouse”.  Masaki was in great vocal shape, able to hold it steady and belt.  The slow, exotic groove of “Pray For the Dead” screams “early 90s” but in a good way.  “Slaughterhouse” has a faster tempo and more “metal” vibe.  Drummer Munetaka Higuchi (R.I.P.) has this song by the balls.  He gets a wicked solo at the end, too.

The sole Mike Vescera song that lingered in the setlist is “Down N’ Dirty” from 1991’s On The Prowl.  A little dated-sounding, its persistence in sets over the years is surprising.  New bassist Taiji Sawada (R.I.P.) has the opportunity to shine on the slinky opening.  The Masaki-era version is heavied-up, but that chorus can’t be saved.  Never cared for it.  But personal favourite “Everyone Lies” comes next in the set, a punchy fast groove with an angry vocal.

Masaki’s old group E-Z-O were not unknowns; they put two albums out on Geffen and are something of a cult band.  Their “House of 1,000 Pleasures” is deservedly visited for track five.  Akira Takasaki takes a wicked solo here, in a song that definitely owns its place on the album.  It’s also nice to get tracks that are not on regular Loudness studio albums when you pick up a live disc.

Track six would fall where “side two” should begin — the single “Black Widow”.  This menacing groove is performed to perfection.  All the tracks are.  Album accuracy is not an issue, but the live versions do have more energy.  “Black Widow” kills, as it should.

Two more of the newer songs follow before they finally dip into classics: “Twisted” and “Waking the Dead”.  Akira blazes for a bit before “Twisted”, just a prelude to the extended jam in the middle of this funky rocker.  The three instrumentalists Akira, Taiji and Higuchi really get a chance to show off their chops as the song goes on for 10 minutes.  After that workout, the straight-ahead riffing of “Waking the Dead” is almost a relief.

The two classics from the Minoru Niihara days are the two most obvious songs:  “Crazy Night” and “S.D.I.”.  Masaki’s style transforms “Crazy Night” into something more 90s.  He simply isn’t the kind of singer to belt out a melody.  Masaki tortures the melody and bends it to his range and growl.  It is not a bad version of “Crazy Night”, but it is a different take than Minoru’s.  “S.D.I.” is the encore, a blitzkrieg of metal that fares well with Masaki leading the charge.  It was always a bit of a screamer.

Once And For All isn’t easy to find, and is often prohibitively expensive.  This isn’t the kind of album you’re likely to just find sitting on the shelf at your favourite used CD store.  It’s the kind of thing that must be sought.  If it were a 5/5 star live album, I’d say “seek it”.  But very few live albums are an 5/5.

4/5 stars

 

REVIEW: Minoru Niihara – One (1989)

MINORU NIIHARA – One (1989 Triad)

Original Loudness vocalist Minoru Niihara was let go in 1988 so they could have a stab at a success with an American singer.  While they went their way (and did not cross over onto the charts as they hoped), Niihara recorded his first solo album appropriately titled One.  He worked at Cherokee studios in Hollywood, where there must have been a lot of rock stars hanging out.  The credits on One include:  Mark Slaughter, Reb Beach, Doug Aldrich, the rhythm section from Journey (Steve Smith and Ross Valory), Kal Swan, David Glen Eisley, and the Tower of Power horns!

That being said, you might expect a straightforward hard rock album right out of 1989 like so many you remember from that year.  You’d be partly right.  However the lyrics are mostly in Japanese, and while the intent might have been to make a straight-ahead commercial rock record, it goes a bit sideways on some tracks.

It sounds like some of the same opening sounds as on Alice Cooper’s Trash album (also 1989) are used on first instrumental “Overture”.  Then it goes soft rock, with guitar strings tinkling like a fragile piece of glass, backed by heavenly keyboards.  In a jarring shift, the first proper song “Let’s Get Together” doesn’t meld well with this intro.  It also sounds a bit out of time, a relic from a couple years prior.  But Minoru is on top of it.  “Let’s get together! Have fun tonight!” goes the boppin’ English chorus, with plenty of the expected thick backing vocals from the Hollywood cast and crew.  Although it already sounded dated for 1989, “Let’s Get Together” is a fun track clearly aiming for a party concert vibe.  Not bad — production is clunky, and there are a couple key changes that sound off, but it’s otherwise a fun song that does what it’s there to do.

American rock vibes dominate “Stand Up to the Danger”, sounding a bit like “Loud and Clear” by Autograph.  That could be Reb Beach just rippin’ it up on the solo, but the track is very standard for the genre.  A neat ballad follows, the Journey-like…ahem…it’s a case of a language barrier, I’m sure, but the song is called “Come Over Me”.  Very much like a Journey ballad, and it’s probably Valory and Smith on bass and drums respectively.  Maxine and Julia Waters on backing vocals.

A cool 80s bass groove sets the tone on “I Can’t Wait”.  This mid-tempo car-cruiser is an album highlight, and a track worth getting in your ears.  Great solo too (Doug?).  Coincidentally, Minoru’s replacement in Loudness was a fellow named Mike Vescera, and he later recorded a different song called “I Can’t Wait” with Yngwie J. Malmsteen.  One of Minbru’s weaknesses (and it probably comes down to English as a second language) is a reliance on cliche song titles.  “I Can’t Wait”, “Stayin’ Alive”, “Dynamite”, and “Fool For You” are all song titles you’ve heard before.

Speaking of “Dynamite”, the next track on the disc — it’s a little more unique.  With a bluesy opening, it soon lets loose with a blast of saxophone.  The chorus is full-on pop.  A little clunky in construction and production, but different and still cool.

A soft keyboard ballad called “You Can Do It” sits right in the middle of the album.  Even though vinyl, and  especially cassettes were big in 1989, One only saw release on CD.  No “side one” or “side two” with this album.  Once more the ballad would sound appropriate on a Steve Perry album, and the guitar solo is really smooth.  Good song; Minoru’s style of singing is a bit overblown for a soulful ballad, but you can certainly tell he loves singing this way.

“Bluest Sky” is cool, acoustic and stripped back but “Stayin’ Alive” really scorches.  It’s the closest thing to classic Loudness.  It is the only clearly heavy metal track on the album.  Probably Reb Beach ripping up his fretboard and whammy bar on the solo.  Definitely Mark Slaughter on the chorus.  The horn section returns on “Fool For You”, but Minoru’s over-the-top singing does not suit the funky metal stylings.  He does well on “Too Long Away to Reach”, a little more restrained.  But it is the third ballad that really does sound like Journey.  So much that you’d assume it was Neal Schon on guitar.

Finally Minoru closes his solo debut on one more ballad, “I’ll Never Hide My Love Again”.  This time it’s a big power ballad with a massive chorus, and because it’s dramatically different from the earlier ballads, it works.  Definite vibes of King Kobra’s “Dancing With Desire” (1985).

See what I mean when I say that One sounds dated already even for 1989?  That doesn’t make it bad, but not all pieces fit.  There are some obtrusive keyboard overdubs, some of the ingredients just don’t mix.  While Minoru is a fine vocalist, and he gives 110% here, some of the songs sound like they would work better if he laid back a bit.  Then again, that could be the language barrier; the words he is singing might be totally appropriate to his vocal output.  Everything in music is subjective anyway.  Regardless of interpretation, Minoru Niihara’s effort is no less than his whole heart, and you have to give credit for that.

3/5 stars

 

 

REVIEW: Loudness – Live-Loud-Alive – Loudness in Tokyo (1983)

LOUDNESS – Live-Loud-Alive – Loudess in Tokyo (1983 Columbia)

Like many classic rock bands, Loudness waited three studio albums before going double live.  The Birthday EveDevil Soldier and The Law of Devil’s Land were ripe and ready for live album immortality.  English is minimal, but you don’t need a Japanese dictionary to enjoy the metal within Live-Loud-Alive.  It is the most galvanized of the metal; Loudness’ integrity uncompromised, with Akira Takasaki in lead shred mode.

With a double length album so early in Loudness’ career, they played plenty of non-album material to fill it.  And it’s good!

Opening with a recording of Holst’s “Mars, the Bringer of War” the band rip right into the riff for “In the Mirror”.  That guitar sounds so classic, you’ll be questioning which Scorpions or Metallica album it’s from.  A heavy chug named “Road Racer” (originally a non-album Loudness single) is paired with one of Minoru Niihara’s most melodic lead vocals.  Only the thick and shimmery (probably embellished) chorus is in English.   On guitar, Akira Takasaki’s solo sounds like he is re-entering the atmosphere after an alien/robot conference in space.  “I Was the Sun” has a slower beat, pounding sheet metal into lethal form, with an elementary riff.  Ordinary as the riff may be, it isn’t the highlight this time.  The chorus takes center stage.  The first side of the original vinyl ended on “Fly Away”, a mammoth of a song mixing the delicate and the heavy.

“Black Wall” opens on what sounds like bass synth, but Akira soon takes command with a melancholy and precise guitar pattern.  Then, like any good Sabbath song, he breaks into a completely different lick, just as catchy.  An instrumental track from Akira’s solo album follows, including a wicked drum solo by Munetaka Higuchi.  This side of the record blows out with “Mr. Yesman”, a complex track like “2112” crossed with “Children of the Damned”.

On side three, a new song is previewed:  “Exploder”, a Van Halen-like guitar instrumental destined for album #4.  This transitions into another instrumental called “Heavenward”, similar to Akira’s solo work.  It’s all just good music that flows track intro track.  Guitar shrieks tell us that “Loudness” is next, a brilliant mid-tempo rocker of radio-ready nature.  It sounds like vintage, early 80s Scorpions.  Another killer riff in “Sleepless Night” brings the side to a solid close.

“Speed” does what it says.  That’s no surprise.  What may be surprising is the quality of the non-album B-side “Shinkiro”.  This cool track has some great melodic twists and an absolutely brilliant and varied Akira solo.  One of his best!  From volume-knob twists to full-on speed, it’s brilliant.  The only way to end it is by going back to the beginning, and “Burning Love”, the first non-album single by the band.  It’s a blistering way to go out.

Though not singing primarily in English yet, their musical influences were clearly the same ones from North America and Europe that we know and love too.  While you may not recognize the songs, many will sound familiar because they draw from the same pool.  It’s the best of early Loudness, void of commercial ambition.  While you do lose the ability to sing along, you can at least slam to the riffs.  One can hear why this album is held in such high esteem by the faithful.  It sounds like an experience.

4/5 stars

REVIEW: Loudness – World Tour 2018 – Rise to Glory – Live in Tokyo (2019)

LOUDNESS – World Tour 2018 – Rise to Glory – Live in Tokyo (2019 Ear Music)

In an unfortunate twist of events, Loudness drummer Masayuki Suzuki was sidelined by stroke and could not perform on the Rise to Glory tour.  Ryuichi “Dragon” Nishida filled in beat-for-beat and appears on the live album World Tour 2018 – Rise to Glory – Live in Tokyo.  This 2 CD/1 DVD combo set is compiled from three days in Tokyo, with a bonus:  the DVD features one track with Masayuki Suzuki from the fourth day.  His performance on “Loudness” is as if there was nothing wrong with him, and he appears delighted to be playing live again.

Live in Tokyo is an energized performance, focusing almost entirely on early Loudness.  This being a hometown crowd, many of the songs are performed with their original Japanese lyrics.  1985’s Thunder in the East takes the early focus on disc one with the first six tracks all being sourced from the “big” album.  These tracks are intense, with solos by Akira Takasaki that melt the face.  Classic Loudness with jagged riffs and still-powerful vocals from Minoru Niihara.

Oldies abound.  Disc 1 also includes “Loudness” (the version with Ryuichi Nishida on drums) from the 1981 debut The Birthday Eve.  A slick, well-received version.  There’s also a punishing “In the Mirror” from third LP The Law of Devil’s Land, and the memorable “Crazy Doctor” from 1984’s Disillusion.

The second disc spotlights two lesser-known albums.  First is The Law of Devil’s Land from 1983.  The first five heavy numbers (including a second version of “In the Mirror”) all come from that platter.  This is the heavy proto-thrash that Loudness were peddling at the start of the 80s, and vicious stuff it is.  But not without hooks!  The last five originated on Disillusion, regarded by some aficionados as Loudness’ best.  From “Crazy Doctor” through the ballad “Ares’ Lament” and the finisher “Esper”, these are some great metal songs.

 

Impressively, the third disc (the DVD) highlights another batch of songs missed on the first two discs:  newer material.  “Soul on Fire”, “Go For Broke”, “Until I See the Light”, “I’m Still Alive” and a pair of instrumentals from the new Rise to Glory (2018) stand up to the earlier material.  The awesome “The Sun Will Rise Again” from the 2014 album of the same name rounds out the freshest material.  The new tunes are still heavy, riffy and melodic, but with a very slight modern edge.  “I’m Still Alive” goes thrash metal, but that’s part of Loudness’ origins.  Besides the return of Suzuki on drums for one song, the highlight of the DVD is a ballad.  After so many brutal songs, Minoru breaks out an acoustic guitar for an unplugged “Ares’ Lament”.  This is completely different than the version on CD 2, which was done fully electric.

Any classic band from the 80s or earlier, still trying to pull it off today, has the same question to answer:  How good is the singer?  Minoru Niihara is excellent.  As if no years have passed.  None of the material presents a challenge.

Considering the mixture of material over the three discs, Rise to Glory – Live in Tokyo would be a suitable entry point for any rock fan wanting to check out Loudness.  You’ll get the hits from Thunder in the East, ample early deep cuts, and a sampling of quality new stuff.  Value for the money and time invested.

4.5/5 stars

 

Sunday Screening: Loudness interview…in English! (2015)

This week I’ve realized that regular readers here are not as familiar as they should be with the legendary Japanese metal band Loudness!  I’ve done my best to educate with my Loudness reviews, but there is nothing better than hearing the story directly from the source.  This brief 2015 interview with the affable Loudness is from the Tuska Open Air Festival in Helsinki, and conducted in English!

The surviving original members Masayoshi Yamashita, Minoru Niihara, and Akira Takasaki are questioned by interviewer Kati Rausch about their history.  Subjects covered:

  • Their first gig (sold out) in 1981 (when Masayoshi was only 19 years old)
  • Switching to English in 1984
  • Their recent album The Sun Will Rise Again
  • Devil horns

A great little 5 minute interview with three guys you can’t help but like.  Check out some Loudness today.

 

LOUDNESS REVIEWS

Tres Hombres talk ZZ Top Deep Cuts on the LeBrain Train

Tons of fun, both on and off topic tonight, on the LeBrain Train.  Aaron from the KMA and Kevin from Buried On Mars were on board with some killer lists of ZZ Top’s best deep cuts.  A lil’ bit of overlap but not too much!  We also read off some guest lists:  San Diego guitarist Mike Slayen, and a local Kitchener singer named Mike Mahler.  Check out their lists as well as ours!

Show time index:

Watch from the start to see the latest CD unboxing from Encore Records.

To check out the new music video by Current River called “Hodder To Hell”, skip to 0:16:45 of the stream.

The ZZ Top talk commences at 0:22:20.

At the end of the show I spun the Loudness video for “Black Widow”.  Find that at 2:32:36.  (No copyright strike, yay!)

I hope you enjoy this week’s show as much as I did!  The 2021 season is off to a great start.